Rittal releases the NEW IT Cooling Brochure

What is the best cooling solution ?

Climate control concepts from Rittal cover the full spectrum of applications, from cooling a single rack through to entire data centres. Security plus optimum energy and cost efficiency are paramount. A diverse range of technical solutions creates individual climate control concepts for racks, suites and rooms. It also includes solutions for Edge Data Centres with high cooling output ensures maximum computing power with short latency periods.

Click –>  NEW IT COOLING BROCHURE  to view or download your copy now

Pages from Rittal_IT_cooling

For more information about the range of cooling that Rittal offer please contact us

E. information@rittal.co.uk

T. 01709 704105

W. Rittal website – cooling

 

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Are Your Enclosures Giving You Heat?

Manufacturing automation systems are delicate and very expensive pieces of kit, which perform vital functions for the businesses they serve.

The enclosures that protect them must have strictly controlled internal environments with interior temperatures that are carefully maintained within a few degrees.  If not, the impact can be harmful to the inverter drives, power supplies, contactors, PLCs and other electrical and electronic components operating within them.  This requires careful control of the climate within the enclosure.

With the current warm weather getting us all hot under the collar; Rittal offers some practical tips on how to evaluate an existing enclosure climate control through a series of simple checks.

How to check your cooling_3

Like all electrical equipment, drives create heat and they therefore have a major influence on the temperatures inside enclosures. Drives are often quoted as having efficiency of 97 per cent, so one with a rated output of 150kW can produce as much as 4.5kW of heat.

As well as the heat loss inside the enclosure, ambient temperatures within a production facility will also have an impact on the temperatures that a drive is operating within.  A typical enclosure climate control system is designed for an internal enclosure temperature of 35°C. This means that the performance of a cooling unit should be specified so that the average internal enclosure temperature of 35°C can be guaranteed under all load conditions and under all the ambient conditions that could be met at the machine’s location.

Checking the enclosure temperature
The first check is to measure the temperature within the enclosure to assess its climate control capability. Temperature sensors should be placed in a position within the airflow of the enclosure, sensors should not be placed on or near direct airflow from high temperature components. Otherwise temperature readings can be found to be inaccurate. The sensors should be left to monitor the temperature trend over a period of time.

If the sensor records air temperatures of well over 35°C (set point) then the output of the cooling unit should either be considered insufficient or, alternatively, that there has been a malfunction of the cold air routing in the enclosure. This means that the cooling air cannot reach (or can only partially reach) the temperature-sensitive components.

How to check your cooling2

 

Checking the control behaviour of cooling devices
Another easy way of checking an enclosure climate control system is to observe the cooling unit’s control behaviour.

Unlike speed-controlled cooling devices such as the new Rittal  “Blue e+” cooling units, conventional enclosure cooling units begin with the two-point regulation of the cooling operation when a temperature inside the enclosure gets above of 35°C and finishes when the shutdown temperature of 30°C is achieved (at a typical hysteresis of 5K).  If a cooling device does not reach the shutdown temperature, a conventional cooling unit will therefore continue to operate. If this happens, it’s a good indication that the cooling unit has an insufficient output and suggest that there is likely to be a deficiency in suitable cooling air to the components inside the enclosure.

You can simply touch a device to determine a refrigerator’s operating status: the activity of the refrigeration compressor during cold production is accompanied by a slight vibration of the refrigerator housing that can easily be felt.  Alternatively, the exhaust temperature of the cooling unit in the external air circuit may be measured.  During active cooling operation, this will be significantly higher (potentially, anywhere between 10° and 40°C) than the ambient temperature.

Locating hotspots
You can also do a rough check of an enclosure’s climate control system with infrared thermography which measure the surface temperatures of the components inside the enclosure and these are recorded with an infrared camera.  If any areas have significantly elevated temperatures (“hot spots”) it is an indication that they are not being supplied with enough cooling air.

More information at www.rittal.co.uk and www.rittal.com/uk-en/content/en/support/reassure or on twitter @rittal_ltd.

FREE SEMINAR: Equipment & Machine Building Excellence

Rittal, in collaboration with key industry partners will be delivering a free to attend seminar hosted by PP Control & Automation.

The event will be scheduled over two dedicated sessions during the morning and afternoon of the 27th June 2018 and is to be held at PP Control & Automation’s premises in Walsall,

Developed with machine and equipment builders in mind, the informative and educational sessions have been developed to demonstrate how Machine and equipment builders can unlock their growth potential by developing best practice approaches to internal processes and engaging the workforce. As well as understanding how technological advances and techniques will benefit their business massively when used properly.

Rittal’s Karl Lycett – Product Manager for Climate Control; will be presenting with Lutze as part of the “Keeping your critical assets cool” on the topic of “Enclosure Climate design for optimal reliability”.

Together we will be highlighting how there are many considerations which need to be undertaken when designing an electrical enclosure to guarantee that high efficiency, cost reduction and optimal reliability is achieved.

In the presentation, Rittal and Lutze will overview some very important points, such as choosing the right cooling equipment for the environment, positioning of electrical componentry and the value of regular maintenance checks—and detail how (when all of these requirements are met) it can have a positive impact on your processes in the long-term.

Venue:  PP Control and Automation, Landywood Green, Cheslyn Hay, West Midlands WS6 7AL 

For full agenda and to registers please visit : https://www.ppcanda.com/free-june-seminar-insights-and-innovations-for-machine-equipment-builders/

How to check your cooling2

 

 

 

 

Rittal on Show at #RailLive18

Increasing safety, reliability & preventing system failure – That’s the message at this years Rail live which is now open.

Showcasing our innovative NEW Location Case specifically developed for Rail Industry call to see us in the Signalling Zone to See the very best enclosure systems and associated power, cooling and security solutions developed for the rail industry.

Rail Live –  20 – 21 June 2018 – Long Marston Airfield, Stratford on AvonIMG_0213v2

http://www.rittal.co.uk

The NEW generation location case from Rittal on show at #RAILLIVE18

Rittal will be showcasing our innovative NEW Location Case specifically developed for Rail Industry at RAIL LIVE 2018 – Increasing safety, reliability & preventing system failures.

See the very best enclosure systems and associated power, cooling and security solutions developed for the rail industry. Come along to see for yourself and speak to the product experts to understand what ‘Rittal – The System’ will mean for you.

For the latest innovations for the rail industry visit Rittal in the Signalling Zone 20 – 21 June 2018 – Long Marston Airfield, Stratford on Avon

 

Rittal New Location Case Infrarail 2018

http://www.rittal.co.uk

 

Essential tips for Temperature Management in the Food Industry – By Karl Lycett, Rittal’s Product Manager for Climate Control

Food processing is a sector that demands very high standards of efficiency to meet daily production throughput targets.  Any unexpected breakdown of critical components which stops production lines can have a major impact, not just in terms of loss of output, but also unplanned maintenance.

Electrical componentry is protected by an enclosure which is designed to protect the equipment from the ambient environment and create a secure atmosphere in which the climate is maintained within the required parameters.

As the temperature rises due to the summer months or random heat waves throughout the year, these parameters can be breached. In turn, the overall life of the componentry within the enclosures can reduce and the probability of an unexpected system failure increases drastically.

Care needs to be taken when implementing climate control equipment to ensure it is suitable to handle the rigours of the environment in which it is situated.

Below are some key aspects to consider when reviewing your climate control solutions.

Is your solution right for the environment?

The type of product being processed on-site and/or the location of the equipment within the facility are likely to heavily influence your climate control solution.

  1. If the ambient temperature of your facility remains lower, year-round, than the desired enclosure internal enclosure temperature then fan-and-filter units and air-to-air heat exchangers can be very effective. They use the ambient air to remove heat energy from the enclosure, releasing it back into the environment.

    If the ambient temperature rises above the desired internal temperature then units with active cooling circuits must be used. Wall/roof-mounted cooling units and air-to-water heat exchangers include a refrigerant to remove the excess heat from enclosures and maintain the desired conditions.

    Already in 2018 we have seen unexpected jumps in average temperatures across the country, and this will only increase as we move into the summer months. These jumps, as I’ve indicated, are what put cooling equipment under the most strain, therefore reviewing existing equipment sooner rather than later can reduce the likelihood of unexpected breakdowns.

  1. Dusty or acidic contamination (e.g. flour or yeast/vinegar extracts) can interfere with switchgear and cause short circuits or a reduction in service life.

HD 2

Applying filter mats to fan and filter units will help, but if the environment is extremely contaminated you might be better off installing a cooling unit to ensure that the internal and external air-paths are exclusive thus ensuring contaminated air isn’t drawn into the enclosure.

Cleaning/Maintenance Regime

Establishing a regular inspection and cleaning of cooling equipment is very good practice.  For example, vacuum cleaning units with filter mats to remove any dust and debris which might choke the fan. The will mean the unit works harder for longer and also reduces its cooling capacity.

Cooling units must also be kept clean to maintain the highest standards of hygiene. Some will be cleaned daily with pressure washers and jet steam cleaners in which case use units which meet the required ingress protection rating desired for your site and purchase additional cowls or covers as needed.

Increasing Energy Efficiency = Reduced Costs

Many food production facilities work around the clock and with energy prices rising globally, it’s vital to get early warning of any potential issue which could impact on productivity or costs.

For example, unlike speed-controlled cooling devices, such as the new Rittal Blue e+ cooling units, conventional units start when the temperature inside the enclosure gets above set point (normally 35°C) and finish when the shutdown temperature of  30°C is achieved (at a typical hysteresis of 5K).  If the device does not reach the shutdown temperature it will continue to operate at full output, using large amounts of energy.  This is one good indicator that the unit is inadequate for the job and that too little cooling air may be getting to electrical components.

The best course of action in all instances is to undertake a survey of your existing cooling equipment utilising the points above.

HD 1

Rittal is happy to offer you a free RiAssure Cooling Inspection in which one of our trained representatives visits your site to provide you with honest, clear advice on your existing equipment and its suitability within the chosen environment/process.

We will then provide you with a short report which includes feedback on the next best steps forward for your installation, whether it is implementing a maintenance contract to prolong the life of existing equipment or the replacement of units that are undersized to improve performance and increase the energy efficiency of your site.

For more information, go to www.rittal.co.uk or email Karl at klycett@rittal.com.

Rittal Launches New – Network Cable Organiser

Modern network infrastructures are reliant on optimum performance and maximum flexibility with their cabling.

The Network Cable Organizer (NCO) is indispensable for ensuring this. It revolutionises patching work on the enclosure, with 8 times faster assembly. This not only nets you huge time savings, it also creates space and order in the rack.

The NCO will mean simple, fast and secure patching while surplus cable lengths, whether CAT 6 or fibre-optic, are simply withdrawn with a spring balancer.
The NCO is a 482.6 mm (19″) cable storage system.

It takes up 1 U in the network enclosure and contains 24 tested CAT 6, Class E patch cables or fibre-optic cables, each with a length of 1.6 m (sufficient for 23 U).

The NCO has a modular structure and is made up of individual cassettes. The pulley system integrated into the cassettes allows surplus cable lengths to be drawn-in automatically. This ensures that every cable is available in the perfect length, eliminating the need to order and stock a variety of different cable lengths.

The result is permanently well-organised cable management, providing a perfect overview of what is connected where.

Rittal Network Cable Organiser fri170303295

Another advantage offered by the NCO is its more efficient energy management. Avoiding airflow blockages that can arise as a result of surplus lengths of the individual cables inside the enclosure facilitates more efficient cooling.

The NCO also saves on space, because it only requires 1 U per switch. Cable management panels are not required, which in turn saves additional space.  Added to which, the flat cables used in the NCO only use one-third of the space of a round cable. The flat cables still offer the same level of reliability, are 100% tested, and the fibre-optic cables additionally have a measurement record on the cassette.
Benefits of the Network Cable Organizer at a glance:

  • Eight-times faster assembly
  • Always the right length
  • Surplus cable lengths are simply withdrawn with a spring balancer
  • Ideal for retrofitting into existing 800 mm racks
  • Tool-free mounting
  • Preconfigured – complete CAT 6 systems including 24 cable cassettes
  • 100% tested – every fibre-optic cable is supplied with a corresponding measurement record
  • Space-saving – 1 U sheet steel mounting frame for 24 cable cassettes
  • Ready to use immediately – cables with RJ 45, LC duplex or SC duplex connectors
  • No unnecessary unpacking, no twisted cables, reduced waste volumes

Each of the 24 slots in the Network Cable Organizer can either be fitted with a cassette with a category 6 patch cable or a fibre-optic patch cable, giving users an unprecedented logic which all but eliminates the need for documentation. All switch ports are physically assigned to a cassette in the NCO, enabling engineers to replace a switch within three minutes without documentation.
Unused patch cables are no longer stored in boxes where the clips can break off. Instead, the cables are at hand immediately inside the NCO enclosure, just waiting to be pulled out and connected. If a patch cable is no longer required, it is disconnected from the patch panel, and stored by withdrawing automatically into the cassette, where it will remain until it is next used.
In summary, the Network Cable Organizer helps to speed up installation and maintenance, saves U, and keeps networks permanently clean and well-organised.
Further information at www.rittal.co.uk and www.friedhelm-loh-group.com or on twitter @rittal_ltd.

Rittal Offers Essential tips for Enclosure Temperature Management in the Food Industry

Food processing is a sector that demands very high levels of efficiency to meet daily production targets. 

And productivity is a growing issue for food production worldwide.  The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs expects the global population to be in excess of 11 billion by 2100.  That’s more than twice what it was in 1990 and so, preparing for tomorrow, there needs to be an even keener focus on productivity to make sure there’s enough food for everyone to thrive.

It’s one reason why breakdowns of critical control and automation equipment in food production are such a cause for concern.  Not only are valuable resources redirected away from more strategic, long term activities, such as developing new processes, but production lines can also be stopped.  The cost of the breakdown increases dramatically if this is the case, as it includes not only the cost of repairing or replacing damaged components, but also the cost of lost manufacturing time.  Stopping one line on which even the humblest of food products is made can cost businesses tens of thousands of pounds for every hour that it doesn’t restart.

Protection of Critical Equipment

Enclosures protect sensitive electronic and electrical items from the atmosphere in which they’re installed, providing an environment that allows them to function as required and which prolongs their service life. 

Maintaining an internal temperature within required parameters is of fundamental importance.  This often requires an active cooling solution because heat is trapped inside enclosures designed to protect against the ingress of solid objects and water to a level appropriate for many manufacturing facilities.  This can be a problem in particular for enclosures that are suitable for washdown environments, which protect equipment to an ingress protection category of IP 69K.  As the temperature rises due to the summer months or random heat waves throughout the year, internal temperature parameters can be breached.  In turn, the life expectancy of the equipment within the enclosures is reduced and the probability of an unexpected system failure increases drastically.

Care needs to be taken when selecting climate control equipment to ensure it’s suitably robust to handle the rigours of the environment in which it’s situated.

Below are some key aspects to consider when reviewing your climate control solutions.

Is your solution the right one for your environment?

The type of product being processed and/or the location of the equipment on site are likely to have a heavy influence on the suitability of your climate control system.

1)   Let’s consider the ambient temperature of your facility.  If it remains lower, throughout the entire year, than the desired temperature inside the enclosure then fan-and-filter units and air-to-air heat exchangers can be very effective.  They use ambient air to remove heat energy from the enclosure and dissipate it into the local environment.

If the ambient temperature rises above the required internal temperature then units with active cooling circuits must be used.  Wall/roof-mounted cooling units use refrigerant as an intermediate medium to remove the excess heat from enclosures, transferring it to the surrounding ambient air, and maintain the desired conditions.  Air-to-water heat exchangers, as the name suggests, transfer unwanted heat to water, transporting it away from the enclosure to centralised cooling plant, possibly outdoors, where it may be more easily dissipated.  Air-to-water heat exchangers have the further advantage that they are a more hygienic solution than cooling units.  They don’t require a supply of ambient air and therefore have no louvres.  They can have a very simple housing that has no dirt traps and is very easy to clean.

Already in 2018 we have seen unexpected jumps in average temperatures across the country, and this will only increase as we move into the summer months.  Peaks in temperature, as I’ve indicated, put cooling equipment under the most strain, therefore reviewing existing equipment sooner rather than later can reduce the likelihood of unexpected breakdowns.

2)   Dusty or acidic contamination (e.g. flour or yeast/vinegar extracts) can interfere with switchgear and cause short circuits or a reduction in service life.

Applying filter mats to fan and filter units will help, but if the environment is extremely contaminated you might be better off installing an air-to-air heat exchanger, cooling unit or air-to water heat exchanger, which all have sealed internal air-paths and thus ensure contaminated air isn’t drawn into the enclosure.

Cleaning/Maintenance Regime

Establishing a regular inspection and cleaning routine for cooling equipment is very good practice.  For example, vacuum cleaning units with filter mats to remove any dust and debris, which may starve the fan and the cooling circuit of air.  This will result in the unit working harder for longer and a reduced cooling capacity.

Cooling systems must also be kept clean to maintain the highest levels of hygiene.  Some will be cleaned daily with pressure washers and jet steam cleaners, in which case use a solution that meets the ingress protection rating demanded by your site and install additional cowls or covers as needed.

Increasing Energy Efficiency = Reduced Costs

It’s important, from both an environmental and a cost saving standpoint, for the producers of foods and beverages to adopt energy efficient technologies.  With a spotlight on carbon footprints and energy prices rising globally, it’s vital that the energy consumed by manufacturing processes is reduced where possible.

The Rittal Blue e+ cooling unit incorporates heat pipe technology and, as such, delivers cooling in a similar manner to an air-to-air heat exchanger, using fans alone, when the ambient temperature is sufficiently low.  As the ambient temperature rises and the heat pipe can’t satisfy demand, speed-controlled components provide additional mechanical cooling, but only as much as is needed.  If the ambient temperature exceeds the temperature required in the panel, active cooling alone is supplied, but, again, no more than is necessary.

Many food production facilities work around the clock and throughout the whole year.  Heat pipe and inverter technology allow the Blue e+ to uniquely capitalise on the daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations in your factory to deliver typical energy savings of 75 per cent.

The best course of action in all instances is to undertake a survey of your existing cooling equipment, taking into account the points discussed above.

Rittal is happy to offer you a free RiAssure Cooling Inspection, for which one of our trained representatives will visit your site and provide you with honest, clear advice on your existing equipment and its suitability within the chosen environment/process.

We will then provide you with a short report which includes feedback on the next best steps forward for your installation, whether it is implementing a maintenance contract to prolong the life of existing equipment or the replacement of units that are either undersized or inefficient to improve performance and increase the energy efficiency of your site.

Further information at www.rittal.co.uk and www.friedhelm-loh-group.com or on twitter @rittal_ltd.   fri170408000

Global production as per Industry 4.0 #VX25

A state-of-the-art centre for manufacturing large enclosures is currently under construction at Rittal’s Rittershausen plant, based on Industry 4.0 principles. While work there is ongoing, Rittal is also installing new high-tech production lines for its new VX25 large enclosure, at a total cost of €120m.

The company is gearing up its production to Industry 4.0 through consistent digitization of processes and fully automated profiling, welding and panel manufacturing units, making the new centre a model for all Rittal production plants worldwide.

In 1961, Rittal made history by manufacturing the first volume-produced enclosure at its Rittershausen plant and by launching its off-the-shelf delivery programme. It was a game-changer for the industry.

Today, the plant is the company’s most efficient factory for manufacturing high-quality enclosures.

The €120m investment sets the future direction for the plant, once work there is complete in 2020.

“Our goal is to establish the world’s most modern centre for manufacturing large enclosures. To this end, we have started the transformation into the age of Industry 4.0. We are setting the next standard in the Rittal production system for our worldwide plants – based on the ‘one Rittal, one standard’ principle,” says Carsten Röttchen, Managing Director International Production at Rittal The Rittershausen plant already featured a high degree of automation in its sub-processes.

“With the increasing digitization called for by Industry 4.0, we will be automating further sub-processes, increasing data consistency and integrating the production process into a completely digitized value chain through a manufacturing execution system”, added Mr Röttchen.

The process improvements include knowledge-based systems that are constantly evolving through data networking and analysis. Trends can be detected in real time, as they arise, by means of continuous target-to-actual comparisons of the production machines and statistical processes. As a result, interference factors can be avoided before they occur and tolerances can be safeguarded in order to achieve the high quality demands of the process. In addition, predictive maintenance data is used to improve the technical availability of the production facilities.

More than 30 Robots Required for VX25 Volume Production In contrast to the new Haiger plant, which is being built on a greenfield site and will be ready to start production at the end of 2018, the conversion towards digitized and automated processes at Rittershausen is taking place during ongoing operations. The first units for the VX25, such as the fully automated panel lines for mounting plates, as well as the profiling and welding systems, have already been installed. When completed in 2020, the new production facility will have three profiling systems, each 70 metres in length. This means that the horizontal and vertical frame sections of the new VX25 large enclosure system, which have perfect symmetry and a consistent 25-mm pitch pattern, will be manufactured in one process.

The volume production lines also have fully automatic welding systems. Thirty-one robots (for welding and handling) deployed in the fully automatic volume welding system will ensure that the transport and welding processes run reliably within the plant. They will also guarantee the Rittal quality standard of the new Rittal VX25 large enclosure system.

“The development of the new VX25 production lines was only the first step on the way to the digital future of the Rittal production facilities. The global transformation of Rittal’s production towards Industry 4.0 is already going flat out,” Carsten Röttchen explained. The transformation has already begun in the Valeggio plant in Italy. The first Industry 4.0 principles are being applied there for manufacturing Rittal Blue e+ cooling units. Rittal is also planning to expand and reorganise the Chinese and US sites, focusing on digital transformation, and getting them ready for the future.

Further information at http://www.rittal.co.uk  and http://www.friedhelm-loh-group.com or on twitter @rittal_ltd.

fri172058000

Innovation Through Consultation: how the Rittal VX25 Enclosure System was Conceived

When you believe your enclosure is already the best, how can it be made better? The answer: by listening, watching and learning from customers.

Rittal’s new VX25 large enclosure was developed from the bottom up, through a year-long study, gathering data and market intelligence.  Detailed, scientific analyses of workshop processes in switchgear manufacturing were coupled with in-depth discussions with customers, and advice from the Rittal customer advisory council. The result was an enclosure geared to deliver maximum customer benefit.

300418.AV VX25 Launch Process-2

Before developing its new VX25 large enclosure system, Rittal’s team commissioned the Munich-based PMO Usability Engineering & Organisational Development Technical Institute to conduct a 12-month field study across three continents and numerous switchgear manufacturers.

Words, images and film were captured and analysed by the Institute’s researchers to document everyday working practices within a large number of small, medium and large companies in Germany, the USA and China.

The user analysis was an eye-opener, not least because it highlighted problems that even the customers themselves hadn’t been aware of.

In total, the study gave Rittal no less than 150 specific requirements for the new enclosure.  These were then combined with findings from the Rittal customer advisory council and every single point was acted upon during subsequent development work.

Reducing complexity

One of the key innovations, highlighted in feedback from Holger Mrzyglodzik, Project Leader at Schubs Steuerungstechnik GmbH, is the fact that Rittal has significantly reduced the number of installed components.

He advises: “The greatest strength of the new enclosure system is its range of accessories. There are fewer parts but their functionality is greater.”

The VX25’s consistent 25-mm pitch pattern has allowed Rittal to reduced the number of individual parts.  So, for example, there are 40 per cent fewer punched sections and rails.

Assemble-friendliness

Rittal has also focused down on user-friendly design elements to speed up installation.

Thomas Frink, Managing Director of KSV Koblenzer Steuerungs- und Verteilungsbau Gmb, says the new enclosure is better than its predecessor, the TS 8 because “it’s easier to assemble, especially in combination with the base/plinth.”

The new frame section with a 25-mm pitch pattern is used throughout, which means the enclosure can be easily expanded, giving users far greater flexibility.

Components such as divider panels and partitions, as well as covers for contact hazard protection and mounting plates, can all be installed from the back of the enclosure.

All this adds up to greater simplicity, speed and convenience during its assembly.   Heinz-Josef Schmitz, Head of Switchgear Manufacturing and Technical Services at the Blumenbecker Group says: “What really impressed me is that you need no more than two tools to complete the enclosure.”

The door and door handle design go one step further, in that both can be mounted and removed without any tools at all.

Wide range of applications

Overall, the VX25 is a far more adaptable and practical enclosure than its forebears.

“The new enclosure is an improvement on the previous model; it is much more versatile,” says Andreas Ripploh, Managing Partner of Ripploh Elektrotechnik GmbH.

It’s worth re-emphasising that all of these innovations were as a direct result of consulting and engaging with outside specialists and customers.  This means, Rittal has been able to develop a new enclosure system that was hotly anticipated even before the launch, and has been warmly welcomed since.

Further information at www.rittal.co.uk and www.friedhelm-loh-group.com or on twitter @rittal_ltd.